mrward

1st PERIOD ENGLISH III

 

08/28/2014

American Non-Fiction

The Declaration of Independence”

Activities:

  • Review Text Analysis: Argument and Reading Skill: Analyze Text Structure (p238)
  • Read from “The Declaration of Independence” (p240-244)
  • Answer Comprehension questions 1-4 on page 245 aloud. Assessment
  • Students answer Text Analysis questions 5-6 on page 111 on paper.
    • Assessment: Review answers aloud.

08/27/2014

American Non-Fiction

Speech in the Virginia Convention”

Procedures:

  • Review Patrick Henry Biography (p228)
  • Review Text Analysis: Rhetorical Devices & Reading Skill:Reading a Persuasive Speech (p229)
  • Read from “Speech in the Virginia Convention” (pgs230-234)
  • Answer Comprehension questions 1-3 on page 235 aloud. Assessment
  • Students answer Text Analysis questions 4-7 on page 235 on paper.
    • Assessment: Review answers aloud.

 

08/26/2014

  • Read pages 266-275 (Franklin’s” Autobiography” and “Poor Richard’s Almanack”)
  • Students answer #7 on page 276 in a short essay

08/25/2014

American Non-Fiction

from “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

Objective: Determine an author’s purpose

Procedures:

  • Review Jonathan Edwards Biography (p122)
  • Review Text Analysis: Persuasion and Reading Skill: Analyze Emotional Appeals (p123)
  • Read from from “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” (p124-127)
  • Answer Comprehension questions 1-3 on page 130 aloud. Assessment
  • Students answer Text Analysis questions 4-7 on page 130 on paper.
    • Assessment: Review answers aloud.
  • Benjamin Franklin’s “The Autobiography” “Poor Richard’s Almanack”Objective: Understand Characteristics of an AutobiographyMake Inferences about AuthorProcedures:
    • Students complete Vocabulary Practice (358) Part A #s1-7 independently
    • Review Analogies with students and have them complete part B #s8-9c
    • Review Benjamin Franklin  Biography (p266)
    • Review Text Analysis: Characteristics of Autobiography and Reading Skill: Make Inferences About the Author (p267)
    • Read from “The Autobiography” (p268-274)
    • Discuss Aphorisms
    • Read and discuss aphorisms from “Poor Richard’s Almanack” (p275)
    • Answer Comprehension questions 1-3 on page 276 aloud. Assessment

08/22/2014

American Non-Fiction

A General History of Virginia”

Procedures:

  • Review John Smith Biography (p92)
  • Review Text Analysis: Narrator and Reading Strategy: Reading Older Texts (p93)
  • Read from “The General History of Virginia” (p94-99)
  • Answer Comprehension questions 1-4 on page 100 aloud. Assessment
  • Students answer Text Analysis questions 5-8 on page 100 on paper.
    • Assessment: Review answers aloud.“of Plymouth Plantation”
      • Review William Bradford Biography (p102)
      • Review Text Analysis: Cultural Characteristics and Reading Strategy: Summary (p103)
      • Read from “of Plymouth Plantation” (p104-110)
      • Answer Comprehension questions 1-3 on page 111 aloud. Assessment
      • Students answer Text Analysis questions 4-7 on page 111 on paper.
        • Assessment: Review answers aloud.

08/21/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 9)

Publishing

Overview/Purpose:

Students publish and share their commentaries.

Guiding Questions: 
What opportunities are there to publish our commentaries and make them public?

 Lesson Design:

  • Explain that writers write for an audience and as a writing community, the class will be your first audience.
  • Students will prepare final versions of their commentaries, editing them for mechanics and grammar.
  • Final, polished commentaries will be shared with the class, either in print or electronically on blogs or discussion boards.
  • Provide students with a structure to respond to each other’s writing. 
  • Encourage students to pursue additional avenues for publication, the school or local newspaper, Teen Ink, blogs, etc.
  • Final Commentaries are due Friday at the beginning of class.

08/20/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 8 )

Overview/Purpose:

Students revise their commentaries to add comparisons.

Lesson Design:
  • Explain that good persuasive writers use comparisons to support their claims.
  • Comparisons can…
    • be written as similes
    • be written as metaphors
    • use hyperbole
  • Ask students to find examples of comparisons in the Commentary Packet.
  •  Share discovered examples.
  • Students find places in their drafts where they might be able to add effective and compelling comparisons as support.

 

08/19/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 7 )

Revising Introductions

Overview/Purpose:

Students revise the leads in their commentaries.

Guiding Questions:

How can revising our leads help strengthen our writing? 

Objectives:

 After this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Revise their commentaries for craft in a commentary
Lesson Design:
  • Explain to students that commentary leads, like all leads, must hook the reader.
  • Using the model texts from the Commentary Packet and any other examples you have used with students, show examples of various kinds of leads. 
  • Some ways commentaries begin:

            * A direct statement:

“Fashion is easy to copy: Counterfeiters buy the real item, take them apart, scan the pieces to make patterns, and produce almost perfect imitations.”

The Real Cost of Fake Goods 

            * An anecdote:

            “Kyleigh D’Alessio never met 16-year-old John Clapper, the

            teenager Connecticut State Police say was the driver in

            Tuesday’s car accident in Griswold that killed four teenagers

            and critically injured a fifth.” 

            ‘Kyleigh’s Law’ is not the Answer for Connecticut’s Young Drivers

* A statement that raised questions:

“With Democrats on the warpath over trade, there’s pressure

for tougher international labor standards that would try to put

Abakr Adoud out of work.”

Put Your Money Where Their Mouths Are

            * A quote or reference to a quote

            “Albert Einstein once said the definition of insanity is doing the

            same thing over and over again and expecting different

            results.”

            Starve, Get Aid, Repeat

  • Consider modeling how to write various kinds of leads for students.
  • Students write at least three possible leads for their commentaries.
  • After composing the leads, students consult with a partner, determining which leads provide the best “hook” and revise their commentaries accordingly.

08/18/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 6 )

Finding Balance Between Fact and Opinion

Overview/Purpose:

Students reread their commentaries, revising them to balance facts and opinions.

Guiding Questions:

How can we strengthen our use of facts and opinions to make our point?

Objectives:

After this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Revise their commentaries for content
Student Skills:
  • Critical thinking
  • Decision making
  • Writing and application of the writing process
Lesson Design:  (Peer Editing)
  • Instruct students to revisit the commentary examples that they highlighted for facts and opinions, reminding them about the conclusions they drew from that lesson.
  • Explain that they will be doing the same work today, highlighting their own writing for facts and opinions.
  • Students should revise their commentaries based on their findings, adding factual information if necessary and/or strengthening the opinions in the piece.

08/15/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 4)

Facts and Opinions in Commentaryc

Planning a Commentary: determining opinion and tone.”

Overview/Purpose:

Students make initial plans for their commentary, determining a statement of opinion, and selecting a tone before making an outline for the piece.

Objectives:

 After this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Experiment using various tones and craft moves
Student Skills:
  • Critical thinking
  • Decision making
  • Writing and application of the writing process
Lesson Design:
  • Explain that commentary writers, like writers of all genres, make some decisions before drafting. 
  • By the end of class, students will be required to turn-in an index card with their name, the topic for their commentary, and a statement that clearly expresses their opinion about the topic and what tone they intend to use in their writing.
  • Model for students how you would determine these things for yourself.  Show how you would experiment crafting an opinion statement and try writing in various tones.
  • Students use the remaining time writing to make these decisions for themselves.
  • Collect index cards at the end of class, reading them to determine who is ready for the next step. 
  • Discuss that each commentary comments on a particular incident.
    • Define each article’s incident.
  • Each incident leads to a larger issue.
    • Define each commentary’s issue.
  • Find each commentary’s thesis and the statement that tells you how the author feels/thinks about the issue.
  • Hand out newspapers and have students choose a news event.
  • By the end of class, students will be required to turn-in an index card with:
    • their name,
    • the topic for their commentary,
    • a statement that clearly expresses their opinion about the topic
    • what tone they intend to use in their writing (formal or conversational)
    • One possible model for a commentary outline is:

       –Lead + Claim

       –Reason #1

          * support (example)

       –Reason #2

          * support (example)

       –Reason #3

          * support (example)

       –Other POV/counter argument  

       –Interesting ending

    • Students work on creating their own outlines and start drafting.

08/14/2014

Writing Commentaries Unit (Day 3)

Facts and Opinions in Commentary

Overview/Purpose:

Students reread commentary examples, identifying the authors’ use of facts and opinions by marking up the text.

Objectives:

After this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Identify use of facts and opinions in commentaries
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of facts and opinions in commentaries 
Student Skills:
  • Critical thinking
  • Analyzing text
  • Comparing and contrasting
Lesson Design:
  • Explain that students will be working with a partner, rereading commentary examples from their Commentary Packet.
  • Students read through selected examples twice.  The first time, they highlight or underline places in the text where the author uses facts.  The second time, using a different color, they highlight or underline places in the text where the author uses opinion.
  • Partners evaluate and compare examples, noting the following:
    • What is the ratio of facts to opinions in each commentary? 
    • How does each author integrate facts and opinions?  When and where in each piece are they used?
    • What impact do you feel facts have in each commentary?  What impact do you feel opinions have in each commentary?c
  • Class regroups to share.  Chart one list of “Facts and Opinions in Commentary” for display in the classroom.

08/13/2014

Defining Commentary
Overview/Purpose:

In this lesson, students work together to create a list of characteristics found in good commentaries.  The class then agrees on characteristics that all commentaries must have.

Lesson Design:
  • Explain that students will work with a group, using information collected in their Commentary Packet to capture what they notice about commentary writing.
  • Students will create a chart together, listing things under the title, “We notice that good commentary writing…”. 
  • Some things worth noticing are: format, point-of-view, tone, content, kinds of sentences, word choice, paragraphs.
  • Groups should be prepared to share.
  • Class regroups to make one list together. 
  • Read through completed list, asking students to consider which of the characteristics are essential (things a commentary must do or include).  Highlight or bold these items.

08/11-12/2014

Learning about examples of powerful commentaries

Lesson Design:

  • Distribute and review Commentary Packet and commentary examples with students. 
  • Read through the first commentary, “Starve, Get Aid, Repeat” by Craig and Marc Kielburger as a class.
  •  Model how to complete the graphic organizer.
  • Students work on reading at least three additional commentaries, completing the organizer.

CLASSROOM PROCEDURES

Be in your seat before the bell rings.

Only a principal can give you permission to go to your car.

Keep any conversation in class relevant to current class topic.

Pick up all trash and place in trashcans  or recycle bin at the end of class.

You are not dismissed by the bell. The bell is to inform the teacher it is time to stop teaching.  Students are dismissed by the teacher. Please remain in your seat until the teacher dismisses you.

Cell phones are not to be used unless the teacher instructs otherwise

If your cell phone is confiscated, your parents will have to claim it at the office the next day.

All other rules, including dress codes, listed in the student handbook will be enforced. If you are seen with any non-allowable item (knife, tobacco, etc.) you will give that item to the teacher upon request. (Let’s review those policies)

Demonstrate the same respect and courtesy for others as you wish to receive.

You are responsible for bringing your own materials to class.

Place assignments in corresponding boxes at the beginning of each class.

You will find previous days’ assignments in notebooks if you are absent.

Use blue or black ink only for all assignments; including quizzes, tests, and essays.

Assignments will be turned in on white paper.  Use college ruled paper for essays.

Late assignments will lose 10 points per day.

Extracurricular activities, including athletic events, club events and after school jobs do not excuse students from deadlines.  All procedures regarding late assignments will apply.

If you turn in an assignment on time and are dissatisfied with your grade, you may redo the assignment and turn it back in the day after it is returned to you.

You have 5 days following your last day absent to make up any work.

Quizzes cannot be made up. If you are absent on the day a quiz is given, you are excused from it and it will not count against you.

Any missed tests will be made up before or after school by appointment within five days.

Grades are determined as follows: TESTS = 40%  ESSAYS = 30%  QUIZZES = 20% CLASS/HOMEWORK = 10%

Fold all assignments lengthwise.

Assignments need to have the following heading printed on the outside fold:

Name: First and Last

Class:  English II, English III, etc.

Period: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.

Date: month/day/year (08/11/2014)

Assignment:  Essay Title, Page #s, etc.

 

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