mrward

1st PERIOD ENGLISH IIIc

02/17/2015

As I Lay Dying 

Common Core Focus: RL3; RL5

Learning Objectives

After completing the activity in this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Understand and explore the use of multiple voices in narration
  • Describe in detail Addie Bundren’s character both from her own as well as other characters’ perspectives
  • Examine the Bundren family through the subjective evidence provided by multiple characters

Guiding Questions

  • How does Faulkner’s form for the novel—a series of competing voices and perspectives presented as a multiple-voice narrative—work for or against the novel’s title?
  • What impact does the sudden voice of a silenced (and dead) character have on the narrative? How does Addie’s voice change the reader’s perception of the Bundren family?

Procedures:

Panel Discussions focus on following topics/questions:

  • Before specifically discussing Addie’s chapter, have students consider:
  • Who is Addie Bundren to each of the characters who speak of her?
  • What are the relationships like between Addie and her children? Addie and her husband?
  • Read aloud the 10th Darl section, which contains a revealing passage:

It [the New Hope sign] wheels up like a motionless hand lifted above the profound desolation of the ocean; beyond it the red road lies like a spoke of which Addie Bundren is the rim. It wheels past, empty, unscarred, the white signboard turns away its fading and tranquil assertion. (p. 108, Vintage edition, 1990)

  • Have students discuss this image—the road “like a spoke of which Addie Bundren is the rim”—in depth.
  • Draw the shape of a wheel on the blackboard, labeling the rim as Addie.
    • Ask students to consider how this reflects the structure of the story. Students might discuss:
  • The symbol of the wheel—how can this be interpreted in relation to family? To narrative form? If Addie is the rim, what or who might the spokes represent?
  • Why is the “New Hope” sign a “fading and tranquil assertion”? Is there a role for “new hope” in this novel? [Students will return to this question in Lesson 5: Concluding the Novel.]

Addie’s voice comes to the reader only after her rotting body was pulled from its “baptism” in the river after the disastrous crossing. Questions that might be valuable in discussing her chapter:

  • Where is her voice coming from, since she is at this point quite dead?
  • What is the placement in the novel of Addie’s chapter, and what is the significance of that placement? Consider who frames Addie’s chapter: Cora before and Whitfield after.
  • How do our impressions of Addie change once we encounter her voice?
  • How does Addie’s perspective cloud or illuminate the themes and issues that we have encountered so far through the other characters’ perspective?
  • What do we learn about her role in the family, and how does that compare to how her children and husband view her? She comes across as bitter, but are the motives of her family any more pure?

Addie displays bitterness about the very fact of existence and a preoccupation about death: “I could just remember how my father used to say that the reason for living was to get ready to stay dead a long time.”

  • She expresses distaste for her students and difficulty relating to her children.
  • She implies that she married Anse for his property and that “living is terrible” after she has Cash, who “violated” her aloneness.
  • Darl’s birth makes her want to kill Anse; she refers to him as “dead,” though he doesn’t know it.
  • She is skeptical about love, which she refers to as a “word . . . like all the others: just a shape to fill a lack.”
  • In fact, she questions the authority of language and the possibility for meaning: “That was when I learned that words are no good; that words don’t ever fit even what they are trying to say at.”

Further questions to consider:

  • What might be the reasons that Faulkner reveals Addie’s interior life only once?
  • Do the characters’ assessments of Addie match with the portrait she paints of herself? Students can refer to their charts (started in Lesson 2) in order to detail Addie’s relationships with her family and community.
  • Why does Addie express uncertainty for meaning in language? How might that theme relate to the presence of her own voice in the narrative? What of the voice of the author?

Name____________________________________ Date_02/17/2015 Class______

As I Lay Dying Chapter Questions

Answer the following questions in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Armstid (Pg 184)

1. What does Anse trade to get a team of mules from Snopes? What effect does this have on Jewel? Or Armstid?

Vardaman (Pg 194)

1. What are the creatures in “tall black circles”?

2. How does Vardaman describe Cash’s sensations of pain?

Moseley (Pg 198)

Vocabulary

1. liefer

2. toilet water

1. What is the difference between Moseley’s and Dewey Dell’s sides of this discussion?

2. How is the Bundren family perceived by the citizens of Mottson?

Darl (Pg 206)

1. As they mix the cement to set Cash’s leg, what image foreshadows the resulting damage to his leg?

2. What does Darl mean when he says, “It would be nice if you could just ravel out into time”?

02/13/2015: No School; Professional Development

 02/12/2015

Quiz:

1. What was Jewel doing when he was sneaking out at night?

2. Why was Anse mad about Jewel buying the horse?

3. Who drives the wagon across the bridge?

4. Who jumps out of the wagon as it starts to turn over?

5. What does Cora Tull say the log was?

As I Lay Dying (Day 8)

  • Review Previous Day’s Questions
  • Learning Objectives
  • Explore the use of symbolism in relation to narrative voice
  • Understand and explore the use of multiple voices in narration
  • Guiding Questions
  • How is the river crossing significant to each of the characters involved?
  • How does the description of the river and the crossing relate to the method of narration
  • Define Symbolism
  • Hand out questions
  • Divide students into four groups and assign questions
  • Groups report back to entire class
  • After, students do vocabulary individually

Name____________________________________ Date_10/03/2014______________ Class______ As I Lay Dying Chapter Questions Answer the following questions in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper. Darl (Pg 156) Vocabulary 1. infinitesimal 2. ludicrous 3. scuttles 4. stagnation 1. When Anse, Jewel, Darl, Vernon, and Cash are looking for Cash’s tools, Anse says, “Was there ere a such misfortune man.” To whom is he referring? 2. Describe Anse’s actions during the hunt for Cash’s tools. 3. Explain the significance of the last sentence of the passage. Cash (Pg 165) 1. Explain the significance of the last sentence in the passage. Cora (Pg 166) Vocabulary 1. expiation 1. Addie tells Cora that her “daily life is an acknowledgement and expiation of (her) sin.” What does she mean? What does Cora think she means? 2. What seems to be Addie’s opinion of grace, according to her conversation with Cora? 3. Where does it seem that Addie has placed her ultimate faith. Addie (Pg 169) 1. Addie’s father told her that “the reason for living was to get ready to stay dead a long time.” How does this help shape Addie as a teacher and as a wife? 2. Describe the nature of Anse’s courtship of Addie. 3. What is Addie’s opinion of the relationship between words and the experiences or images that they signify? 4. What seems to be Addie’s most prized emotional possession? 5. What causes Addie to have her affair with Whitfield? 6. What is Addie’s response to Cora? 7. How does Addie rationalize her life after her affair with Witfield? 8. What does Addie mean by “cleaning up the house afterward”? Whitfield (Pg 177) Vocabulary 1. surmount 2. transgression 1. When Whitfield hears that Addie is dying, what is his resolution? 2. What is Whitfield’s stated motivation for revealing his sin? Is this the same as his actual motivation? 3. What does Whitfield see as a sign of God’s forgiveness for his adultery? 4. Why does Whitfield not reveal his sin to Anse? Darl (Pg 180) 1. Anse has been adamant that his children not “flout” the memory of Addie by doing such things as riding a horse, or bringing their tools in the wagon. How does Anse flout Addie’s memory in this section? 2. The function of the italicized text in this section seems to be to show us Darl’s thoughts about Jewel while the rest of the events are happening. What is the purpose of this? 3. In the last paragraph, what image is repeated to describe Jewel’s horse?

 02/11/2015

As I Lay Dying (Day 7)

  • Review Previous Day’s Questions

•                     Learning Objectives

  • Explore the use of symbolism in relation to narrative voice
  • Understand and explore the use of multiple voices in narration
  • Guiding Questions
  • How is the river crossing significant to each of the characters involved?
  • How does the description of the river and the crossing relate to the method of narration
  • Define Symbolism
  • Hand out questions
  • Divide students into four groups and assign questions
  • Groups report back to entire class
  • After, students do vocabulary individually

As I Lay Dying Chapter Questions

Answer the following questions in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Darl (Pg 128)

Vocabulary

1. gaunt

2. monotonous

1. When Jewel is sneaking out late at night and sleeping during he days, Addie either does his chores of gets one of the other children to do them, and hids that from Anse. Why is this ironic?

2. What do Cash and Darl think that Jewel is doing out late at night? Are they right?

Tull (Pg 137)

1. Vardaman gives Vernon the confidence to go back over the bridge to his mule. What is the significance of this passage?

Darl (Pg 141)

Vocabulary

1. flotsam

2. irrevocable

3. plaintive

4. stanchion

1. What images are used to foreshadow the wagon’s destruction?

2. Compare and contrast the final two images of the passage: Jewel beating his horse, and the final appearance of the mules out of the water.

Vardaman (Pg 150)

1. What is unusual about the syntax of this passage? What is the purpose?

2. What is the function of the italicized portion of this passage?

Tull (Pg 152)

Vocabulary

1. sacrilege

1. How does Cora interpret the log’s destruction of the wagon? What is Vernon’s response to Cora?

2. In her conversations with Vernon, when does Cora seem to learn most heavily on religion?

02/10/2015

As I Lay Dying (Day 5)

  • Review Previous Day’s Questions

•                     Learning Objectives

  • Explore the use of symbolism in relation to narrative voice
  • Understand and explore the use of multiple voices in narration
  • Guiding Questions
  • How is the river crossing significant to each of the characters involved?
  • How does the description of the river and the crossing relate to the method of narration?
  • Define Symbolism
  • Discuss Direct and Indirect Characterization
  • Hand out “The Many Voices of As I Lay Dying” worksheet (due at end of novel)
  • Assign questions and vocabulary: (see attached)
  • Read aloud through page 123 (end of Tull).

Lay Dying Chapter Questions

Answer the following questions in complete sentences on a separate sheet
of paper.
Darl (Pg 103)
Vocabulary
1. cattymount
2. surreptitious
1. When Darl looks at Dewey Dell, who does he see in
her eyes? What is the significance of this?
Anse (Pg 105)
1. Why does Jewel not leave with the rest of the famil
y? What happens in this passage?
Darl (Pg 107)
Vocabulary
1. capitulation
2. scoriation
3. soporific
4. uninferant
1. Describe and explain the significance of the New Hope
church sign.
Anse ( Pg 110)
1. What is ironic about Anse’s monologue about society?
2. What is Anse’s source of comfort as he tries to get
to Jefferson?
Samson (Pg 112)
1. What observation does Samson make about Anse? How ac
curate is he?
2. What does Samson say is a key difference between me
n women?
Dewey Dell (Pg 120)
1. What sentence perhaps best sums up Dewey Dell’s menta
l and emotional state?
2. Explain the significance of the paragraph beginning “The
land runs out of Darl’s eyes.”
3. What is the function of the syntax in the last par
agraph, where Dewey Dell mentions belief in God?
Tull (Pg 123)
1. According to Vernon, what is the most unnerving part of
Darl’s personality?
2. Do you think it is Anse’s promise to Addie that makes hi
m go to Jefferson despite the flood? Why or
why not?
3. What details about Jewel show his inner ambivalence and r
age?
02/09/2015

                                                    As I Lay Dying     Chapter Questions

Answer the following questions in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Darl (Pg 75)

Vocabulary

  1. bevel
  2. burlesque
  3. caricaturist
  4. fluctuant
  5. impalpable
  6. reverberant
  7. silhouette
  1. Contrast Cash’s and Anse’s response to the rain.
  2. Once the coffin is finished, how do the men treat it differently? What is the significance?
  3. How does Darl explain Jewel’s discontent?
  4. What does Darl mean by the use of “is” and “was” at the end of the passage?

Cash (Pg 82)

  1. Cash’s longest passage comes in the form of a logical argument. What does this tell us about him?

Vardaman (pg 84)

  1. What does this very short passage express?

Tull (Pg 85)

Vocabulary

  1. Commence
  1. What is ironic about Addie’s funeral attire?
  2. When Whitfield enters, does he focus matters on God or on himself? How do you know?
  3. What is the function of the italicized passage on pg 90-91? 92?
  4. Where has Vardaman been during the service?

Darl (Pg 94)

Vocabulary

  1. implacable
  2. portentous
  3. retrograde
  1. Darl says, “I cannot love my mother because I have no mother. Jewel’s mother is a horse.” Explain the significance of this.

Cash (Pg 96)

 

  1. What is the argument here about?

Darl (Pg 97)

Vocabulary

  1. emaciation
  1. Explain the significance of Jewel’s physical appearance.

Vardaman (Pg 100)

  1. What does Vardaman want that is town?
  2. Explain the odd conversation between Darl and Vardaman as they are getting ready to go in the wagon.

02/06/2015

As I Lay Dying (Day 5)

  • Review Previous Day’s Questions
  • Learning Objectives

  • Explore the use of symbolism in relation to narrative voice
  • Understand and explore the use of multiple voices in narration
  • Guiding Questions
  • How is the river crossing significant to each of the characters involved?
    • How does the description of the river and the crossing relate to the method of narration?
  • Define Symbolism
  • Discuss Direct and Indirect Characterization
  • Hand out “The Many Voices of As I Lay Dying” worksheet (due at end of novel)

Read aloud through page 74(end of Tull).

Assign questions and vocabulary: (see attached)

Name____________________________________ Date_______________ Class______

As I Lay Dying Chapter Questions

Answer the following questions in complete sentence form on a separate sheet of paper

Darl (Pg 47)

Vocabulary

1. approbation

2. censure

3. engendered

4. juxtaposition

5. keen

6. penurious

7. semblance

8. travail

9. ubiquity

1. Describe Cash’s last interaction with his mother.

2. What is the function of the italicized text in this passage?

3. Contrast Anse’s reaction to his wife’s death to the way his children respond.

Vardaman (Pg 53)

Vocabulary

1. fetlock

1. Who does Vardaman think is responsible for his mother’s death?

2. Explain what Vardaman means when he says he is “vomiting the crying.”

3. What revenge does Vardaman take on Peabody?

Dewey Dell (Pg 58)

Vocabulary

1. stertorous

1. Explain Dewey Dell’s view of pregnancy.

2. Is Dewey Dell self-absorbed? How can you tell?

3. When Dewey Dell finds Vardaman hiding in the barn, how does she interact with him?

Vardaman (pg. 65)

1. Why does the nailing of the coffin represent such a crisis for Vardaman?

Tull (Pg. 68)

1. Compare and contrast Vernon and Cora’s views of appropriate ways to help others in need.

2. Verdaman seems to be confusing his mother with the fish that he caught. How do Cora and Vernon interpret this mental reaction to Addie’s death?

3. How does Vardaman try to “save” his mother?

4. How does the end of this section summarize Vernon’s feelins about Cora’s judgments?

02/05/2014

As I Lay Dying (Day 4)

  • Review Previous Day’s Questions
  • Guiding Questions
  • What does a character’s voice reveal about themselves?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of learning about something or someone through multiple perspectives?
  • Define Characterization
  • Discuss Direct and Indirect Characterization
  • Hand out “The Many Voices of As I Lay Dying” worksheet (due at end of novel)

Read aloud through page 47 (end of Peabody).

Assign questions and vocabulary: (see attached)

Name____________________________________ Date_______________ Class______
As I Lay Dying Chapter Questions
Answer the following questions in complete sentence form on a separate sheet of paper.
Tull (Pg 29)
1. What phrase does Anse repeat in this (and subsequent) passage? Why is it an example
of irony?
2. How does Tull feel about helping Anse?
Anse (Pg 35)
Vocabulary
1. hale
2. victuals
1. How does Anse’s monologue about the road express his basic personality?
2. What phrase or idea is repeated throughout this passage that shows Anse’s primary
source of frustration?
3. Anse ends the chapter by saying, “But I just can’t seem to get no heart into it.” How is
this a summary of Anse’s life?
Darl (Pg 39)
1. What image does Darl notice that evokes the Fates?
2. Earlier, Dewey Dell ‘s sexual encounter with Lafe was presented with imagery of fate
and death. How does that continue in this chapter?
Peabody (Pg 41)
1. How is Peabody’s reaction to Anse similar to Tull’s reaction?
2. According to Peabody, whom does death affect the most?
3. What image foreshadows the fact that Addie’s death will happen very soon?
4. How is alliteration used in the last paragraph of the passage to express the emotional
effect of the sound of Cash’s saw?

02/04/2015

As I Lay Dying (Day 3)

  • Discuss student’s essays, “What Is A Southerner?”
  • What makes “the South” an interesting setting?
  • Discuss assumptions and stereotypes about the South vs. historical facts.
  • Define Narrator
  • Discuss different types of narrators and the effect of 1st, 2nd, 3rd Narrators and omniscient narrators
  • Discuss reliable and unreliable narrators
  • What does it mean to have multiple voices or perspectives instead of just one?

Read aloud through page 28 (Dewey Dell).

Assign questions and vocabulary: (see attached)

Name____________________________________ Date_______________ Class______

Do Vocabulary and Answer Questions on a separate sheet of paper.

Darl (pg 3)

 Vocabulary

1. Adze

2. Dilapidation

3. Endued

4. Plumb-line

1. What details about Jewel foreshadow his personality?

2. What is the significance of the comparison of the wooden boards to gold?

3. Explain the spacing of the words “Chuck. Chuck. Chuck”

Cora (Pg 6)

Vocabulary

1. Chide

2. Shucks

1. How does Cora contradict herself in this chapter?

2. What detail indicates past tension between Cora and Addie?

Darl (pg 10)

Vocabulary

1. brogans

2. gourd

3. hiatus

4. leech

5. myriad

6. orifice

1. What details are used to show the difference between the Bundren family and the Tull family, as far as social position?

2. What is unusual about the way Jewel interacts with his horse?

Jewel (Pg 14)

1. What is unusual about the structure of this novel so far?

2. What does Jewel think Cash’s motive is for building the coffin?

3. What is the significance of the repeated phrase “One lick less”?

Darl (Pg 16)

Vocabulary

1. aghast

2. decorous

3. flail

1. What literary device enhances the exact nature of Vernon Tull’s spitting?

2. What details are used to show Anse Bundren’s (Pa’s) incomplete masculinity?

3. What repeated details are you noticing about Jewel?

Cora (Pg 21)

Vocabulary

1. coddled

2. frailed

3. partiality

1. What elements are unique to Cora’s narrative style?

2. According to the Tulls, what seems to be the primary motivating ethic for the Bundrens?

Dewey Dell (Pg 26)

Vocabulary

1. dassent

1.  In the first section, Darla views Cash’s work as turning the boards into gold as they become their mother’s coffin. How does Dewey Dell view this work?

2. What details about Dewey Dell’s sexual encounter with Lafe link it with fate and death?

01/30/2015: No School. Inclement Weather

01/23 – 29/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 7-8): Refuting an Argument

Objective(s): Make a counter-argument

01/23/2015:  Assignment: Prompt 1 from TCAP Grade 11 Writing Practice Task III

01/26/2015: Assignment: Prompt 2 from TCAP Grade 11 Writing Practice Task III (in class)

http://tncore.org/sites/www/Uploads/Assessment/Grade11Practice3BirthOrder.pdf

01/23/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 6): Refuting an Argument

Objective(s): Make a counter-argument

  • Students examine the process of refuting an argument: they look at the thesis statement, the main supporting points, and the examples of an opponent’s argument and then try to make a counter argument.
  • The first argument they examine is how life has changed after industrialization.
  • Then, on their own, they try to refute an argument .

 

Main Lesson:

(1) Hand out the first argument that says the quality of life has decreased after industrialization.

  •  Have the students annotate to pick out the thesis, main arguments, and supporting points.
  1. On page two, decide whether the original arguments are true or false.
  • And then make counter arguments.
  1. Go over the three steps to refuting an argument.  
  • Examine the refutation sentence by sentence and decide whether each sentence is:

   (a) Introducing the opponent’s argument

   (b) Evaluating the opponent’s argument

   (c) Making a counter argument.

  1. Next look at the lexical phrases of making refutations.
  • Go over them with the students. Have the students underline them in the refutation.
  1. Have the students examine the argument for cutting down rain forests.
  • And then, they follow the same process for making a refutation.

 

http://bogglesworldesl.com/lessons/argument3.htm

01/22/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 5): Weighing an Argument

Objective(s):

  • Examine the process of building an argument.
  • Students examine the process of building an argument: they look at the thesis statement, the main supporting points, and the examples needed to complete a coherent argument.
  • The first argument they examine is whether smoking should be banned in public places.
  • Then, on their own, they try to build an argument for using public transportation.

Preparation:

Introduction:Write the title of today’s lesson, Building an Argument.  

Main Lesson:

  • Write thesis statement on the board and explain what thesis statement means.

  • Then write Thesis Statement: Smoking should be banned from public places on the board.

  • Make sure the students understand what that means.

  • Ask them if they agree or if they think it’s a good idea.

  • Now divide the board into two and write the headings Supporting Points and Examples.  

  • Then ask the students why smoking should be banned from public places.  

  • They may give you a supporting point or an example (sometimes it’s hard to distinguish).

  • When you have enough supporting points and examples hand out the worksheet titled Building an Argument.

  • Compare the class discussion with what is written on the worksheet.

  • Have one student read the paragraph on banning smoking and then check that everybody understands the paragraph.  

  • Go over the second page of the worksheet with connecting language.  

  • Briefly explain how each connecting phrase is used and then have the students go back to the paragraph and find all the examples of the connecting language.

  • Finally, write Thesis Statement: People should use public transportation on the board.

  • The students will now do similar analysis of this issue on their own.

  • The teacher will walk around the room providing help and suggestions.

  • For homework, you might want to have the students do a second paragraph with the thesis that alcohol causes many problems in society.

 

http://bogglesworldesl.com/lessons/argument2.htm

01/21/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 4): Weighing an Argument

Objective(s):

  • Evaluate an Argument

Students complete Election Worksheet

  • Review answers on board

Ask students how much they weigh or how much things around them weigh.

  • Now write the lesson title  Weighing an Argument on the board. 

  • Next draw a set of scales on the board.

  • On one side of the scale, write pros and, on the other side, write cons

  • Now ask students what “pros” means and what “cons” means.

  • If they don’t know, tell them pros are the good points and cons are the bad points.

  • This will be better demonstrated by going through the warmup activity.

Write the topic:Should students elect their teachers on the board?

  • Ask the students if this is a good idea. 

  • Then divide the board into two and write pros on one side and cons on the other side.

  • Ask the students what the pros of electing teachers would be.  

  • Next ask the students what the cons are.

Now hand out the sheet Weighing an Argument.

  • Compare what the class wrote with what is on the sheet.

Now discuss the phrases, on the one hand and on the other hand.  

  • Have one student read the paragraph and check that everybody understands the paragraph.

  • Note: The whole paragraph is written using hypothetical speech, or subjunctive mood (would, might). The reason for this is that students don’t actually elect their teachers in reality.

Now have students in pairs choose a topic and follow the same procedure.  

  • Tell them to find at least three pros and three cons for their topic.

  • After that, they have to rewrite their pros and cons into a paragraph.

01/20/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 3): Understanding Rhetorical Strategies in a Persuasive Essay

Objective(s):

  • Analyze rhetorical strategies in a speech
  • Explain rhetorical strategies used in the speech to persuade the audience
  • Write a persuasive essay expressing an opinion about the overall effectiveness of a speech

Distribute copies of Severn Suzuki’s Speech at the Earth Summit (1992)

  • Have students read speech aloud (or play audio).
  • Have students to express Suzuki’s claim.

Students use SMART Chart to identify rhetorical terms in speech.

  • Share with class on board

Assessment:

  • Using your SMART Chart and write an essay evaluating the evidence in Suzuki’s speech.

01/19/2015: No School; Federal Holiday (MLK)

01/16/2015: No School; Inclement Weather Day

01/15/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 2): Understanding Rhetorical Elements

Objective(s):

  • Identify a variety of rhetorical concepts within a speech.
  • Comprehend the connection between a speaker’s word choice and audience.

Distribute copies of Rhetorical Triangle, SMART Chart, and copy of Coretta Scott King death penalty speech.

  • Have students read speech aloud (or play audio).
  • Students pair up and analyze the speech using Rhetorical Triangle chart.
  • Identify examples of ethos, pathos, logos
  • Students share with class.

Distribute SMART Bank of Rhetorical Terms.

  • Students look up words and add to Academic Vocabulary Notebook.

Have students switch partners and complete SMART Chart for speech.

  • Students share with class.

Assessment:

  • Write an analytical essay discussing the rhetorical terms in the Coretta Scott King speech and their effect on the audience.

01/14/2015

Argumentative Essay (Day 1):

  • Objective(s):
    • Identify elements of ethos, pathos, logos in and advertisement

Students define and add following terms to their Academic Vocabulary Notebook:

  • ethos
  • pathos
  • logos

Have student write on the following topic:

Describe a time when you were trying to persuade your parents to let you do something new or risky – a request to which they which they were inclined to say “no” initially. How did you go about persuading them to see things your way? Describe things you said as being either ethos, pathos, or logos.

Have students relate their experiences to the class and have the class decide if it is ethos, pathos, or logos.

Hand out two different car ads from magazines.

(Toyota Highlander, Toyota 4Runner)

  • Ask students to record answers for each ad for the following questions:
  • Who is the target audience? Describe the person who would buy this car.
  • Is ethos, pathos, or logos the most prominent? Why?
  • Is this ad effective for the intended audience?
  • Why does the manufacturer want this particular audience to buy this particular car?

Hand out copies of the Rhetorical Triangle.

  • Have students fill out worksheet for one of the ads.

Put students in groups of three.

  • Give each group a different car ad.(Toyota Camry, Ford Super Duty, Ford Fusion)
  • Each group do one Rhetorical Triangle for their ad.

01/13/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 7): Final Essay

Objective: Write an Analytical Essay which explores which of two authors more effectively uses rhetoric to advance his purpose.

  • Students read excerpt from Patrick Henry’s “Speech in the Virginia Convention”
  • Students read and complete Prompt 2 of TCAP Grade 11 Writing Practice Task II (Due by end of class).

http://tncore.org/sites/www/Uploads/Assessment/Grade11Practice2War.pdf

01/12/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 6): Rhetorical Devices

Objective: Understand Rhetorical Devices

Read a Persuasive Speech

Pre-Lesson: Review Persuasive Rhetoric on pages 226-227

Students write down terms and definitions in their own words

Procedures:

  • Review Patrick Henry Biography (p228)
  • Students complete Vocabulary Study (281) and Vocabulary Practice (282) worksheets
  • Review Text Analysis: Rhetorical Devices & Reading Skill:Reading a Persuasive Speech (p229)
  • Read from “Speech in the Virginia Convention” Handout
  • Answer Comprehension questions 1-3 on page 235 aloud. Assessment
  • Students answer Text Analysis questions 4-7 on page 235 on paper.
    • Assessment: Review answers aloud.
  • Students complete Text Analysis (277, 278) worksheets
  • Remediation: Students complete Question Support (285) worksheet.
  • Enrichment: Use Additional Selection Questions (271) to facilitate further discussion.

01/09/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 5):

You have now read the excerpt from Common Sense by Thomas Paine. In this text, Pain develop several central ideas.

Determine two central ideas of the text and write an essay that analyzes how the author develops these ideas over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another. Be sure to cite evidence from the text to support your analysis. Follow the conventions of standard written English.

01/08/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 4): Citing Textual Evidence

Vocabulary:

  • Cite

Read “Two Days With No Phone” aloud

Students complete “Cite Your Evidence” worksheet

Assignment:

Text-Dependent Questions for Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense”

  1. What did you learn after reading lines 52 -56? Why is this important to the overall point of the essay?
  2. What is the most important point in lines 37 – 51? How do you know?
  3. What supporting details does the author include to help you learn about England’s relationships with other nations? (Give line numbers for each detail.)
  4. What does the author think about people who argue that Britain is the “parent country” of the American Colonies?

01/07/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 3): Rhetorical Devices

Vocabulary: ethos, pathos, logos, rhetoric

  1. Begin the lesson by asking students what needs to be present in order for a speech to occur.

    Though the question may seem puzzling—too hard, or too simple—at first, students will eventually identify, as Aristotle did, the need for a speaker, a message, and an audience.

  2. The class should discuss audience and the importance of identifying the audience for speeches, since they occur in particular moments in time and are delivered to specific audiences.

    This is a good time to discuss the Rhetorical Triangle (Aristotelian Triad) or discuss a chapter on audience from an argumentative textbook.

    You may wish to share information from the ReadWriteThink.org lesson Persuasicve Techniques in Advertising and The Rhetorical Triangle from The University of Oklahoma.

  3. Next distribute Queen Elizabeth’s speech to the troops at Tilbury (with questions) and use the speech and its historical context as a model for the processes students will use on the speech they select.

     Provide a bit of background informationon the moment in history.

  4. Then, as a class, go over Queen Elizabeth’s speech and discuss the rhetorical devices in the speech and the purpose for each one.  

    Adjust the level of guidance you provide, depending on your students’ experiences with this type of analysis.

     The questions provide a place to start, but there are many other stylistic devices to discuss in this selection.

  5. Discuss the audience and the author’s manipulation of the audience.  Consider posing questions such as

    • This is a successful speech.  Why?

    • Elizabeth uses all of the appeals – logos, pathos, and ethos – to convince all of her listeners to fight for her from the loyal follower to the greedy mercenary.  How?

    • The tone shifts throughout the selection.  Where?  But more importantly, why?

  6. If time permits, discuss how politicians and speech writers employ rhetorical strategies to influence the opinions of their audience members. Refer to recent elections,

    if possible, and/or bring in flyers and/or brochures.  Here’s one example from the past you could use:

    Martin Luther King, Jr. uses an appeal to pathos in his “I Have a Dream” speech through his historical allusion to Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: “Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.” This is particularly effective for his audience of people sympathetic to the cause of African American men and women who would have been especially moved by this particular reference since it had such a significant impact on the lives of African Americans. 

01/06/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 2): Analyzing NonFiction

  • Students look up the following terms and add to vocabulary notebook:
    • analyze
    • text
  • Review “Changing the Ecosystem” on screen:
  • Students complete exercises from “Changing the Ecosystem” handouts.
  • Students write a one page summary of “Common Sense” excerpt.

01/05/2015

Analytical Essay (Day 1): Finding the Main/Central Idea

CLASSROOM PROCEDURES
MR. WARD 2014 – 2015
Be in your seat
before the bell rings.
Remain in your seat for the entire class period.

Keep any conversation in class to a minimum and relevant to current class topic.
Pick up all trash and place in trashcans at the end of class.

You are not dismissed by the bell.
The bell is to inform the teacher it is time to stop teaching.
Students are dismissed by the teacher.
Please remain in your seat until the teacher dismisses you.

Your cell phone and other electronic devices are to be turned off and put away.
If your cell phone is confiscated, your parents will have to claim it at the office.
All other rules, including dress codes, listed in the student handbook will be enforced. If you are seen with any non-allowable item, you will give that item to the teacher upon request. (Let’s read the dress code aloud).

Demonstrate the same respect and courtesy for others as you expect to receive. (Do not speak while others are speaking. Be polite. Don’t interrupt.)
You are responsible for bringing your own materials to class.

Place assignments in corresponding boxes at the beginning of each class.
If you are absent, you will find the previous days’ assignments in notebooks on table.
Use blue or black ink only for all assignments:
Including quizzes, tests, and essays.
Assignments will be turned in on white paper. Use college ruled paper for essays.
Late assignments will lose 10 points per day.
Tests will be made up after school.

Extracurricular activities, including athletic events, club events and after school jobs do not excuse students from deadlines.
All procedures regarding late assignments will apply.
If you turn in an assignment on time and are dissatisfied with your grade, you may redo the assignment and turn it back in the day after it is returned to you.
You have 5 days following your last day absent to make up any work.
Quizzes cannot be made up. If you are absent on the day a quiz is given, you are excused from it and it will not count against you.
Grades are determined as follows:
TESTS = 40%
ESSAYS = 30%
QUIZZES = 20%
CLASS/HOMEWORK = 10%
Fold all assignments lengthwise.
Assignments need to have the following heading printed on the outside of the fold:
Name: first and last
Class: English III or English III
Period: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.
Date: month/day/year
Assignment: Essay Title, Page #

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